Progressive Web Apps vs Published Store Apps

This isn’t really a technical issue but more of a question around how you would choose (or have chosen) to get your app to market having struggled with the Apple and/or Android approval.
Without going into details about my Apple publishing issues (mainly centered around, but not limited to, supporting Apple Pay as my payment mechanism) , I’m inclined, either as a temporary measure or even permanently, to release my app as a Progressive Web App (PWA). From the end user’s perspective, I see no functional difference between a native and PWA app running on my phone.

Has anyone here released their app purely as a PWA (either out of choice or as a fallback ), and how have your users responded?
Did many not sign-up because the app wan’t on the stores?
Did they have trouble understanding the concept PWAs or have doubts about running them on their phones?

This is an issue I’ve been pondering as I inch towards completion of my Adalo desktop app. I’m going to cave in and redevelop as native mobile apps (Apple + Android) because these platforms hold the users, and especially in Apple’s case, the PAYING users.

If we were to start an offline business: ie restaurant, retailer, distributor, service business- we would need to pay rent to a landlord or buy our own building/storefront. Apple’s rent is higher at 30%, but logistics and overhead in software are much lower. More importantly there is safety and security baked into the process of App Store approval, which means you automatically are extended the trust of customers. Finally, my sense is that it will be easier to market an app that has the tacit approval of Apple/Google.

3 Likes

I think the answer to this is very subjective based on what your app is, what it does and who the user base is.

Really hard to answer it conclusively but in my own personal opinion, and based on some of the apps I have launched. The user’s don’t necessarily care where the app comes from if it is still easily accessible and does what they want it to do.

2 Likes

@tdhi, @Colin Thank you for your input. I’m having this very debate with non-technical members of my team. I’m of the opinion that PWAs are a perfectly valid method of deployment. Apple also appears to be tacitly encouraging the use of PWAs : https://love2dev.com/blog/apple-encouraging-progressive-web-apps-by-rejecting-apps/.
The ‘marketing arm’ of my team is adamant that vetted store apps are required and will give users extra confidence. I suppose I have to be professional and give even input from marketing due attention :slight_smile:
We’re also a bit fortunate in that we’re writing the app for a charity and seeing a link to the PWA app on the charity’s own site will offer users reassurance.
Its looks like a pragmatic plan of attack will be to initially offer the PWA app and work on resolving our issues with Apple…and possibly Google.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 10 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.